Meet more of our Trustees!

A few months ago we got to know some of our trustees a little more, here we meet the fabulous Hannah and Tracey!

Hannah

Why did you become a Trustee for Womens Health Matters?

I applied to be a trustee for WHM because I had known about the organisation since I was a child in Leeds, and so had an understanding of the impact the charity has. I moved from a job in a charity to one in the local authority and wanted to stay connected to the third sector in some way. As I had time and hopefully useful skills to offer, WHM felt like a natural choice to approach about volunteering as a Trustee.

What is your favourite thing about Womens Health Matters?

My favourite thing about WHM is the fact that every time I read a report or speak to the staff about the work they are doing with women, I am overwhelmed yet again with what an incredibly important service WHM delivers. And that all the staff and all the trustees have a uniting belief that women can and should be in control of their own lives and health. It’s a great team to be part of.

What do you do outside of Womens Health Matters? 

I work for Leeds City Council Children’s Services, in the Voice and Influence Team. I coordinate participation, consultation and involvement activities specifically for children who are looked after or care leavers, including running two young people’s Council’s. My job also involves working closely with senior leadership, service leads and councillors related to Children’s Social Care Services.

If you had a magic wand what would you do with it?  

I’d give every little girl in the world unshakable self-confidence. And I’d make houses self cleaning – no more wasted hours scrubbing the bathroom!

 

Tracey

Why did you become a Trustee for Womens Health Matters?

I first became aware of WHM though the joint work with the Maternity Liaison Services Committee (now Maternity Voices Partnership). I am a doctor who works in the maternity units in Leeds. I am passionate about empowering women to make the right choices for them during their pregnancies. I have particular interests in supporting vulnerable women and supporting those women who may face challenges accessing services. I run a specialist clinic for those women who have had female genital mutilation to ensure they have the right information during their pregnancies and at the time of their births. As WHM also supports those groups of women, I wanted to be able to provide my own support by volunteering to become a trustee.

What is your favourite thing about Womens Health Matters?

Whenever I hear the stories and journeys of women who have been helped by WHM, it reiterates the importance of the work the charity does. Attending the AGM always makes me be proud of what women can achieve, despite often extreme adverse situations. It is so positive to see how women’s lives can change, given the right support and help through WHM.

What do you do outside of Womens Health Matters?

I am a consultant working in the two maternity units in Leeds. I always knew that when I qualified as a doctor that I wanted to work in Obstetrics. I am passionate the care that is provided to women allowing them to make and be supported in the choices for birth.

If you had a magic wand what would you do with it?

I would want all women worldwide to be able to access safe and free health care during pregnancy.